I Watched and Reviewed Fuller House– So You Don’t Have To

ABC’S “TGIF”-lover’s of the ‘90’s rejoiced around the world when Netflix announced it’s 13-episode reboot of “Full House,” entitled, “Fuller House,” in April of 2015. However, the public displayed a very different reaction after the series was renewed for a second season last month. Here’s why: despite the nostalgic shots of the Tanner family’s famous San Francisco home, the soothing sound of Uncle Jesse’s beguiling singing voice, and Stephanie’s heart-warming catchphrase, “How rude!” the sequel series consistently fails to live up to its predecessor.

The first episode was meant to trick us. Tears (almost) filled my eyes as episode 1 opened with the original theme song from season 1 and quickly cut to the family home where we were greeted by the entire original cast, excluding the Olsen twins. Aside from Bob Saget, all the original cast members look aged, but well. John Stamos looks the best of all, no shocker there. I immediately felt at home watching Joey and Jesse’s witty and childish banter and baby Tommy comes to a close second in cuteness to baby Michelle. One of my personal favorites was the return of Mr. Woodchuck and Joey’s Bullwinkle impression. There were, however, obvious problems at this point. Kimmy proves she is still stuck in the ‘80’s. Stephanie enters with a weird faux-British accent. Most cringe-worthy was the address to the Olsen twins, who opted not to participate in the reboot, in which the cast awkwardly stares at the camera for 10 seconds. The revamped theme song is then played, showing the original shots of the cast next to remakes of them filming the same shots now, which pulls on the heartstrings. This sentiment is unfortunately ruined by Carly Rae Jepson’s cover of the theme song playing with the shots. This is where it all goes downhill.

By the end of the first episode Danny, Joey, Jesse, and Becky (let’s be real, the best parts of the show) are gone and Stephanie and Kimmy move in with DJ Fuller (punny name, Warner Brothers) to help raise her three kids after she is widowed, so a.k.a. the exact plot of the first series. While I am all for a role-reversed Full House, throughout the series DJ seems unaffected by her husband’s death. Kimmy’s daughter, Ramona, is moderately annoying, and the try-hard jokes only prove to be funny when they are delivered by either DJ’s adorable middle child, Max, or Kimmy’s soon-to-be ex-husband, Fernando. My heart jumped each time an original adult returned for an episode, but my dreams crashed each time they left again and I was stuck with watching Steve (who I used to love) and Matt, the hunky veterinarian, awkwardly vie for DJ’s heart. There was an abundance of awkward sexual innuendos, which felt out of place. While DJ fit into the uptight role of Danny and Stephanie glided into the roles of both the lazy Aunt and the goofy friend to the boys, Kimmy is left with an uncharted path as she decides what to do about her marriage. In classic Full House fashion, sad music is played around minute 25 of the 30-minute episode while an adult delivers a speech that contains some meaningful lesson to a child, but it simply isn’t the same without one of the three original men delivering them.

All in all, Fuller House returns to America the family we all know and love, but the sequel series ultimately proves that everything we loved about Full House—the warm dynamic, ridiculous sitcom situations, and heartfelt lessons—belong in the late ‘80’s. Was it as amazing as its predecessor? Not even close. Will I watch season two? Probably.

Sentinel Grade: C+

Rebecca Leonard ’16, Staff Writer

 

Posted by on April 5, 2016. Filed under Arts. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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