Aren’t We Still a Year Away?: 2016 Presidential Race Already Off to a Quick Start

The presidential race is continuing to heat up, even in the first days of fall. Fifteen Republican candidates still remain in a field led by businessman Donald Trump, while only five Democrats stand to challenge their party’s front runner, Hillary Clinton. The Republican race has been the more contentious of the two, with each of the candidates relying on heated debates and contentious comments on television to maximize their time in the spotlight.

 

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This is especially evident with Mr. Trump, one of the most provocative, pompous candidates the American public has seen in recent memory.  Mr. Trump’s unprecedented campaign strategy has shocked the American public and the media with the success it has generated for Trump in the polls, despite the daily plethora of belligerent remarks by Trump. This strategy has somehow resonated with voters in major battle states of Iowa and New Hampshire, where Trump has been leading by double digit figures as of late.  

Behind Trump in the field is Ben Carson, a neurosurgeon at Johns Hopkins University, who lacks any previous political experience; carson is polling a close second in Iowa and New Hampshire.  Mr. Carson’s soft-spoken style has become a welcome alternative to those opposed to Trump’s brashness.

Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina made a big splash in both debates this summer, taking charge in the lower section of the first debate, and then sparring against Mr. Trump on Planned Parenthood and foreign policy in the second debate earlier this month.  With Hillary Clinton struggling with accusations surrounding her misuse of a private email server, Ms. Fiorina has, in recent weeks, become a rising figure for female voters.

Floridians Marco Rubio and Jeb Bush have been nearing the lead for most of the early part of the race.  Both have had above average debate performances, with Mr. Rubio garnering a consensus win in the first debate from many news sources.  Mr. Bush has raised the most money for his campaign, over $120 million largely raised through his various super PACS, more than double the amount of most GOP candidates.  It seems likely that once the field thins out, Bush will use his surplus of funds for campaign ads and other strategies to attempt to rise in the polls and secure the nomination.

On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton is continuing to be the far and away leader in the polls and is currently expected to win the nomination. However, as a result of the aforementioned email controversies, there is still some room to gain on her.  Self-proclaimed “socialist” Bernie Sanders and a so far unannounced Joe Biden have risen somewhat in popularity, but if Clinton keeps the negative media attention at bay, she should be able to coast to the nomination.

Obviously we are still more than 13 months out from Election Day 2016, but the developments in the field now will start to dictate who jumps out to a solid lead by the winter and spring, deciding which two candidates will face off in the race to become the 45th President of these United States.

 

Porter Bowman, School News Editor

Posted by on September 29, 2015. Filed under World News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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