Radcliffe Wows in “The Cripple of Inishmaan”

He’s the boy who lived, the boy who ran naked with horses, and now he’s the boy with the decrepit body and a dream. Yes, it’s Daniel Radcliffe and he’s return to Broadway to take the stage as Cripple Billy in Martin McDonagh’s “The Cripple of Inishmaan.” For those of you who do not have extensive knowledge of the isles of the United Kingdom, Inishmaan is a small island of the west coast of Ireland. Today the population remains at a steady 160 people, making it the smallest of the three Aran Islands, and where the play is set. The year is 1934 and a small group of people live in the community of Inis Meáin. Two aunts take care of a young man named Billy Claven, a man who was abandoned when his parents took their lives. He is seriously crippled, one leg constantly extended and a small arm that resembles that of a T-Rex arm that remains at his chest. News spreads that a filmmaker has come to Ireland to make a movie and intends on taking one lucky Irishman or woman home to Hollywood to make them a star. Billy Claven decides it’s his destiny to go, and that he must go immediately as he is dying of “consumption” (tuberculosis).

Daniel Radcliffe with "Harry Potter" costars Emma Watson and Rupert Grint.

Daniel Radcliffe with “Harry Potter” costars Emma Watson and Rupert Grint.

Although Daniel Radcliffe is really only in the show for a very short period of time overall, he delivers an amazing performance as Billy Claven that leaves one wondering how much he spends on a good masseuse due to the amount of time he spends on stage hunched over to convince the audience he is truly lame. He plays his character with honesty and sincerity, and it is evident he really knows who Billy is. The rest of the cast delivers wonderful performances as well, especially Sarah Greene as the vile, foul mouthed, flirtatious Helen McCormick.

It takes a while to adjust to the thick Irish accents the cast uses and the entire play seems to be without plot for most of it, but overall the performance is worth a look. The set is well constructed and eye catching, as it is constantly spinning with a new room to be seen with every turn.

So if you have some time on your hands and want to visit Ireland this show is for you. If you’re hard of hearing or can’t understand an accent for your life, maybe just read the play.

— Riley Vaske, Managing Editor

Posted by on April 23, 2014. Filed under Arts. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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