SLS Biology Students Celebrate Cells

Surely, you’ve wondered what’s been shrouded behind those delightfully fluorescent balloons… or, why on earth does a sign warning bystanders of “flying ATP” even exist? Perhaps, as we all have, you attempted and failed to define “cell-ebration.” Many students on the hilltop admit that it has become increasingly difficult to ignore colorful objects suspended in mid-air bursting out of Room 230. To answer your questions, and sate your curiosity, the Sentinel investigated this peculiar subject and found the cell-ebration just as interesting as it appears.

Dr. Higgins’ 9th grade Biology students, assisted by juniors and seniors in AP Biology, have undertaken the enormous task of jointly transforming their classroom into an accurate model of a cell. A new experience for St. Luke’s, the cell-ebration is open to visits by all students, staff and faculty members on the Hilltop. The cell-ebration will demonstrate how proteins are synthesized and used throughout the body.

Dr. Higgins’ Biology students are celebrating cells, the building blocks of all life. \

Dr. Higgins’ Biology students are celebrating cells, the building blocks of all life.
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Like all school-related projects, students initially approached the cell-ebration with mixed feelings, even skepticism.  Some wondered about the effectiveness of this unconventional project: “You focus on one organelle for one group” said a 9th grade Biology student. “I’m not learning a whole lot about the cell, but about one specific part of it.” Some students even went so far as to state they would rather have followed in the footsteps of grades before them and done the “DNA structure” model. And certainly things didn’t go entirely according to plan: the first model of the cell proved to be a fire hazard, and balloons had to be removed from the hallway (although they’ll reappear briefly on Friday).

However, the Sentinel discovered that the general student consensus was positive.“I was hired to make Biology fun,” Dr. Higgins stated, when asked why he decided to choose cell-ebration instead of the traditional “DNA structure model” that previous 9th graders had come to dread. Most students interviewed felt he has succeeded. “It’s a fantastic project,” claimed one freshman.  “It’s helpful – we learn how the cell functions instead of just reading a textbook,” said another. Many cited Dr. Higgins for bringing “a new kind of enthusiasm” to the Hilltop, one that is very appreciated

However one views the cell-ebration, clearly the project represents an uncommon and unique approach to teaching, as well as an opportunity for innovative and creative student expression. Don’t take our word for it, though.  The cell-ebration takes place Friday, Nov. 1st during A, B, C, and E periods.  Decide for yourself whether Dr. Higgins is “insane in the membrane!”

— Josie Williams, Staff Writer

Posted by on October 31, 2013. Filed under School News. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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