Teachable Moment: Civil Discourse

Every four years the St. Luke’s History Department organizes and oversees a mock Presidential election at school, with advisories dividing up into states to “replicate” the Electoral College.  Last week’s mock election showed that we had many students and faculty supporting each candidate, with roughly one third voting for President-elect Trump and roughly two thirds voting for Secretary Clinton.  Our outcome mirrored Connecticut’s but not the national results, and we saw democracy in action.

It won’t surprise anyone to learn that emotions were high on all sides going into this election, and we have seen that continue in the days since November 8th.  Not surprisingly, the divisions we see in our country at large also play themselves out here at school.  In a few instances, this has led to behaviors not in keeping with our core values, school culture or Honor Code.  Knowing this, and wanting to remind everyone of our expectations, I made the following points at this week’s Upper and Middle School town meetings:

-At St. Luke’s we value respectful discourse and encourage discussion of different viewpoints.

-Among other things, respectful discourse means not making your disagreements personal.  For example, it’s not in keeping with our values to call someone an idiot, or to suggest that they are a bad person, or a racist because you disagree with their point of view.  We expect that no one will engage in behavior or use language intended to intimidate or humiliate anyone.

-If you’re struggling with how to manage a difficult or emotional conversation, seek out a faculty member or an advisor for advice.

-Our culture of kindness doesn’t mean you can’t disagree or strongly argue your point. In fact, debate – respectful debate – is the essence of a healthy democracy, and a core element of what it means to participate as a citizen of a democracy. Whichever candidate you supported, and whatever policies you agree or disagree with, now and in the future, I hope every one of you will not shy away from understanding the issues, debating them with others, and working hard to make our democracy strong and healthy.

What I didn’t say, but perhaps should have, is that everyone has a right to feel how they feel.  If you feel excited and optimistic because your candidate won, that’s understandable and OK.  If, on the other hand, you feel sad and fearful, that’s also understandable and OK.

Since November 8th we have seen a spike in overt harassment of minorities in schools, including schoolyard bullying, taunts, and even the Royal Oak middle school students seen chanting “Build the wall” on a video that went viral.  It’s not a partisan act to condemn these things and to assure those people in our community who fear what could happen to them or their loved ones that we will keep them safe here at school. This is how a school community acts with integrity and stays true to its fundamental values.

And so we will encourage—no, insist on—civil discourse at St. Luke’s.  While we have no wish to monitor every interaction among students, when we learn of students not respecting each other we address it and will continue to do so.  As the St. Luke’s Honor Code reminds us:

As members of the St. Luke’s community, we will maintain and encourage integrity at all times.  We will be honest in what we say and write, and we will show respect for ourselves, each other, and all property.  We will treat everyone with kindness, and we will accept responsibility for our actions.

Read Look for the Beacons for more about honor at St. Luke’s.

 

5 thoughts on “Teachable Moment: Civil Discourse

  1. This is an amazing post and why I love SLS so much. Thank you for your leadership in this and to continue to model how we live our mission.

  2. This is an amazing post and why I love SLS so much. Thank you for your leadership in this and to continue to model how we live our mission.

  3. I must say it was hard to find your page in google.
    You write great articles but you should rank your page higher in search
    engines. If you don’t know how to do it search on youtube:
    how to rank a website Marcel’s way

  4. ศูนย์รักษาผู้มีบุตรยากศูนย์รักษาผู้มีบุตรยาก โรงหมอจุฬารัตน์ 11
    อินเตอร์

    ศูนย์รักษาผู้มีบุตรยาก โรงหมอจุฬารัตน์
    11 อินเตอร์ : Chularat 11 IVF Center ตั้งขึ้นด้วยความตั้งใจที่ช่วยทำให้คู่สมรสสามารถเอาชนะอุปสรรค อันเนื่องมาจากต้นเหตุต่างๆที่ส่งผลต่อการมีลูกยาก โดยกลุ่มหมอผู้ที่มีความชำนาญเฉพาะด้านรักษาการมีลูกยากจากสถาบันที่เป็นที่รู้จักเป็นที่ยอมรับ ผ่านการศึกษาอบรมจากในแล้วก็เมืองนอก และมีประสบการณ์มาเป็นเวลายาวนาน รอให้คำปรึกษาแล้วก็ดูแลคนป่วยอย่างครบวงจร โดยมีจุดประสงค์หลักเพื่อการเกื้อกูลคู่บ่าวสาวที่มีปัญหาการมีบุตรยาก ให้สามารถมีลูกได้สมความมุ่งหมาย ด้วยบริการด้านเทคโนโลยีช่วยการเจริญพันธุ์ที่มีความทันสมัยและมีมาตรฐานเป็นที่ยอมรับในระดับสากล
    ศูนย์รักษาผู้มีบุตรยาก
    ถ้าหากคุณแต่งงานมานานกว่า 1 ปี แล้วก็ร่วมเพศบ่อยแม้กระนั้นยังไม่มีครรภ์
    แปลว่าคุณกำลังอยู่ใน “ภาวะการมีลูกยาก” โดยหลักการแล้วหากว่าสภาวะนี้จะไม่ใช่โรค แม้กระนั้นก็คือปัญหาสำหรับคู่สมรสที่คาดหวังอยากมีเจ้าตัวน้อย เพื่อความสมบูรณ์แบบของชีวิตครอบครัว
    การที่คู่ครองไม่สามารถมีลูกได้อาจเป็นเพราะความผิดปกติอะไรบางอย่างที่มีผลต่อสภาวะการเจริญพันธุ์ ทำให้ไม่อาจจะมีการปฏิสนธิได้ตามธรรมชาติ โดยอาจมีสาเหตุจากฝ่ายหญิงหรือฝ่ายชาย หรือทั้งสองฝ่าย
    ไหมรู้มูลเหตุศูนย์รักษาผู้มีบุตรยาก

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *